Hole's Top 10 Favourite Vegetable Varieties

Each year at Hole's, we tweak and perfect the way we grow our crops, so that we can provide you with better choices and the best advice. Here is a list of our absolute favourite vegetable varieties, sold here, at Hole's Greenhouses.

1. Sweet 150 Tomato

A Canadian favourite, Sweet 150 Tomatoes can produce more than 150 tomatoes per season. Bursting with flavour, these cherry tomatoes are perfect for fresh eating, cooking, & even juicing. Pick up your Sweet 150 Tomato plant today to keep you snacking all season long.


2. Odyssey Apple Tree

If you don’t have an apple tree in your garden yet, what are you waiting for? Developed in Manitoba, Odyssey apples are yellow with red blush. Much like Gala apples, Odyssey apples are very sweet and great for fresh eating. These apples are ready to harvest in mid-September, and store for up to 3 months. 


3. Minimato Tomato

A unique cherry tomato that is perfect for container growing. Our Minimato Tomato plants come ready-to-go, and can stay in their pot all season long. We have a very limited supply of Minimato Tomatoes this year. Get yours today as they are sure to go quickly!


4. Scarlet Nantes Carrot

Because of their sweet and juicy qualities, Scarlet Nantes Carrots are our favourite for snacking, cooking, and topping salads. These carrots grow beautifully in cool weather and shrug-off frost with ease.


5. Cool Breeze Cucumber

Here’s a cucumber that is really different. Cool Breeze is bred to set perfect fruit without cross-pollination. No male pollen is needed, so even if bees are scarce you'll still get a great crop!

If you’re short on space, these cucumbers can also be grown on a fence or a trellis for uniform straight fruit.


6. Cylindra Beets

As its name suggests, Cylindra is a cylindrical beet. This Danish heirloom is smooth-skinned with dark purple-red flesh, and grows a dark red, elongated root.

Cylindra is a favourite in the kitchen due to it's uniform slices and ease of peeling.

Nearly two thirds of the length of the root will grow above ground, so some gardeners like to hill up soil around each plant as the root emerges. This will keep the skins of the root very tender and protect them from insects.


7. Ghost Chili Pepper

Hole's smoking hot garden favourite! Great things come in small packages. The Ghost Chili Pepper is considered one of the world's hottest peppers, measuring between 850,000 and 1 million Scoville units on the heat scale. When ripe, it turns a fiery red!


8. Goliath Tomato

Just as the name suggest, this plant produces enormous beefsteak tomatoes. With tomatoes this big, be sure to provide a cage for support. Great looking plant as well, with high yields—up to 70 tomatoes from a single plant! Great for sandwiches and burgers... if you can find a bun big enough.


9. Bodacious Sweet Corn

The trifecta of corn varieties: great for fresh eating, freezing and canning. High quality sweet corn that has large, mouth-watering kernels. A popular market variety that shows tolerance to common rust and tolerates cold weather conditions better than other varieties.


10. Green Arrow Peas

The best thing about this variety is the pea-pod length. These extra long pods mean a generous yield of sweet, tender peas. Each pod will contain between 9 and 11 peas! Happy picking.


Visit Hole's Greenhouses today for better choices, and the best advice.

20% Off Corona Tools!

A Corona tool in the shed is an investment in years of reliable performance. A Corona tool in hand is the means to forge a truly proud outdoor space.

Visit Hole's Greenhouses & receive 20% off all Corona tools. While supplies last. Get yours today!

PLUS, everyone who purchases a Corona tool is eligible to enter our draw for a $100 Hole's Greenhouses gift card! 

 

Hole's Houseplant Of The Week!

Browse Hole's wide selection of indoor & tropical plants today!


Red-Edged Dracaena

There are many Dracaena plants. This distinctive version is distinguished by the purple-red edges on its ribbon-like green leaves. This plant grows slowly, but is capable of reaching heights of 8-15ft.

Dracaenas grow best in bright, indirect light. Although this plant can tolerate a wide range of conditions, it will grow best in a well lit, warm, humid space - like the kitchen!


Fiddle Leaf Fig

Don't let this tropical plant fool you... it is a tough plant that adapts easily to its environment. This houseplant grows quickly and can grow up to 6 feet tall! Maintenance is minimal - pruning and watering are simple, just keep your Fiddle Leaf Fig in bright, indirect light and you will be the owner of a happy plant. 

 

 

 

 


Spider Plant

This week's feature is the Chlorophytum comosum, also known as the Spider Plant. These plants rarely present problems and are very adaptable, making them great for new gardeners or anyone looking for some low maintenance greenery. These plants are also fantastic air cleaners! Put one in your child's bedroom, bathroom, or any room that could stand to be freshened up. 

With light watering and indirect sunlight, your spider plant will produce flowers, which dangle from the mother plant. These flowers will eventually develop into babies or “spiderettes,” creating a spider-web-like appearance, hence the name!

The best way to grow “spiderettes” into their own plant is to allow them to remain attached to the mother plant and plant in soil in a neighbouring pot. Once the “spiderette” has rooted in its own pot you are free to cut it away from the mother plant.


Peace Lily

The Peace Lily is a resilient household plant with amazing air cleaning capabilities, so much so, that it has secured a spot on NASA’s list of “Top 10 Household Air Cleaning Plants.” Peace Lilies clean all 5 of the most common household toxins in the air!

Dubbed a “Reminder Plant”, Peace Lilies let you know when they require water by sagging slightly. This visual queue not only makes them easy to care for, but can also be used as a reminder for other tasks. It is this “reminding” quality that makes them a great plant for students or that forgetful friend of yours.

Be aware that the leaves are poisonous for both humans and animals, so keep them away from children and pets.


Fig Tree

This week's Hole's Houseplant is none other than the Fig Tree! Fig Trees are the classic indoor plants and come in several different varieties including Weeping, Bonsai, Saber Leaf, Fiddle Leaf, Variegated, and Braided—to name a few!

Fig Trees come in sizes both big and small and can tolerate a fairly wide range of light conditions—from full-light to filtered-light. They need a bit of time to adjust to a new room; however, once they become adjusted to a space, they are able to reach equilibrium and thrive.


Aloe Vera

As an easy to care for plant, with natural health properties, Aloe Vera has become an incredibly popular houseplant.

Aloe Vera likes dry soil, so I recommend using cactus potting soil mix. Give your Aloe Vera a bit of space, because the mother plant will offset the “babies” from the outer base. One of the most common issues new plant owners run into when trying to care for Aloe Vera is that they overwater the plant.

To harvest leaves from your Aloe Vera, start by selecting mature leaves from the outermost section of the plant. Cut them from as close to the base as possible, but be mindful not to disturb the roots.


Pothos

Pothos is a great home air purifier. It is a long, leafy vine that can reach 40 ft in tropical jungles, but typically taper off at about 6-10 ft when grown in containers.
 
Although it is a vine, Pothos does not cling or climb surfaces. However, it can be gently twined around hooks or trellises to give a clinging appearance and create bold home décor.
 
Pothos are arguably the best indoor plant for busy environments like offices or dorms, where they may be overlooked from time to time. Although not recommended - they do have a reputation for tolerating poor light conditions and erratic watering! Keep your Pothos healthy and strong by placing in bright indirect light and watering when the soil has dried.

Mom's Favourite Plant, By Jim Hole

When I think back to Mom and her Mother’s Day ritual, it revolved around ensuring that things went smoothly both in the greenhouses and in the vegetable field.

There really was precious little time for her to relax on Mother’s Day, and even if you were to suggest that she should take it easy on her special day, she couldn’t imagine not being out and about and chatting with customers in our greenhouses.

One question I still get asked regularly is, “What was your Mom’s favourite plant?” It seems like a pretty simple question, but she, like so many avid plant people, didn’t really have a favourite plant.

I did learn a lot about the plants that were dear to her when we walked around the greenhouses and fields. What she loved more than anything on these walkabouts was to graze on fruits and vegetables. She would grab a handful of raspberries, strawberries, currants, gooseberries, Nanking cherries and Saskatoons–among others–and pop them in her mouth. Peas and string beans were other favourites, along with some crunchy cucumbers.

Mom grew up in Buchanan, Saskatchewan and grazing was something that she did frequently in her parent’s garden–it was in her blood!  She also kept cherry tomatoes in containers on her patio so that she could grab a handful anytime she had a craving for some sweet, juicy fruit.

When it came to flowers, she always planted a wide variety of bedding plants because she loved the masses of gorgeous flowers throughout the year. She also planted several rows of gladiolus corms because she loved to use the flower spikes in vases. During the summer, she always had massive displays of ‘glads’ in her living room and kitchen.

Now, while Mom would say that she didn’t have a favourite flower, if you really tried hard, and told Mom to pick just one flower that was special to her, she would always say it was the marigold.

That answer caught a lot of people by surprise because while marigolds are handsome flowers, they aren’t spectacular. Mom chose the marigold because it was the first bedding plant that launched Mom and Dad into their greenhouse business. 

 

Today, whenever I am in the greenhouses and see the flats of marigolds growing in our greenhouses, I always think of Mom. For me, it’s as much symbolic as it is beautiful.

 

- Jim Hole


This year, Hole's Greenhouses is carrying the Chica Orange Marigold. Treat your gardens or commercial landscapes to colour all season long. Superior uniformity, early-to-flower, with excellent performance.

Hole's Guide To Mother's Day Gifts

Looking for that perfect Mother's Day gift? Look no further! Hole's has all the products you need to show Mom you care & to help her get into the garden!

Hanging Baskets

Pick up one of our famous hanging baskets for Mom and brighten up your yard, balcony or patio. Online ordering and scheduled delivery available!

Click here to order.


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Floral Arrangements

The Floral Studio at Hole's has been hard at work creating an abundance of beautiful bouquets specifically for Mother's Day. Available in a variety of sizes, choose from our Canada 150 theme or Garden theme.

Click here to order.


Hummingbird Feeders

Pick up a hummingbird feeder for Mom and receive a FREE bag of nectar concentrate hummingbird food. A great way to decorate your yard and enjoy the wildlife all at once. With a variety of designs and colours to choose from, you can't go wrong with this gift!


Vicki Sawyer Gift Boxed Mugs

With beautiful graphics, and chip resistant porcelain, get creative with how you use them!


Brier Gardening Products

Hole's carries a wide range of Brier's beautiful kneelers, kneepads, boots and hand tools, offering attractive and practical products to get gardening tasks done in style.

 


LAFCO Candles & Diffusers

LAFCO products use natural essential oil based fragrances and blown art glass vessels, complimenting any space and creating the perfect ambiance.

Click here to order a LAFCO Candle.


LOVEBLOOM Blooming Tea

A masterpiece of hand-crafted blooming tea. Enjoy a gathering of fresh springtime tea in a heart-shaped tea. Let the heart sink within your teapot and attend the spectacle love has prepared for you.


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Canada 150 Gloves

Celebrate Mom and Canada's 150th Birthday with these Hole's exclusive gardening gloves. Available in a variety of sizes, these red and white gloves are the best way to show your Canadian pride this spring. 

Click here to order a pair for Mom!


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Kitras Art Glass

Give the gift of inspiration with these unique glass ornaments. Like trees in a forest, no two are alike. Each ornament has a special hang tag story with a sentiment for each theme. All ornaments come ready to give in a gift box.


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Home Decor

Add character to your home with any of our home decor pieces. Put a smile on Mom's face with one of these cheerful welcome signs.


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Everygreen Gazing Balls

Gazing balls make a unique sculptural accent for patios and gardens. They date back to 13th century Italy, and are historically thought to bring good luck. They're one of our most popular garden décor items.


DRAMM Watering Cans

Picking up a plant for Mom? Complete the gift with a DRAMM watering can! Available in a variety of sizes and colours, she'll be sure to appreciate the thoughtful gift.

Click here to order a colourful 2L DRAMM watering can for Mom.


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Faux Succulent Arrangements

Realistic and modern, these beautiful arrangements have been designed to add tranquility and bohemian flare to any space. Featuring high quality artificial succulents they are ideal for your home or office.

No Space, No Problem! University of Alberta Students Build Sustainable Growroom

A group of University of Alberta students, lead by Hayley Wasylycia, are gaining attention after building an Urban Growroom on campus, based on Space10 Growroom’s open-sourced design. In fact, the University of Alberta’s Growroom is the first ever Space10 Growroom to be built outside of Denmark.

The Space10 Growroom is a multi-tiered, spherical garden, designed to alleviate the issues of available space that often arise when trying to integrate food and gardens into the urban landscape.

Hole’s Greenhouses is pleased to have been involved in the outstanding project, through the donation of greenery. Beyond urban growing and sustainability awareness, there are tremendous benefits on-campus Growrooms and plants have for students. With their air cleaning and oxygen producing capabilities, studies show that plants boost attention spans and increase productivity. A Growroom on campus provides students with a tranquil space to catch a breath of fresh air between classes, studying and exams.

The University of Alberta’s Urban Week event took place March 20th-24th, 2017, during which time the Space10 Growroom was on display. It will soon find a permanent home in Edmonton, and a permanent one on the University of Alberta campus is being explored.

Visit https://growroomyeg.com/ for more information and upcoming Space10 Growroom locations.

Study Better... Just Add Plants!

With final exams quickly approaching, Hole's Greenhouses is now offering students a 10% discount on indoor plants. With their air cleaning and oxygen producing capabilities, studies show that plants boost attention spans and increase productivity – making them your best study-buddy yet!

Check out these articles for more information on the benefits of plants:

House Plants Make You Smarter -Scientific American

Plants In Offices Increase Happiness & Productivity -The Guardian

Study better than every before... just add plants!

The Geranium Grower, By Jim Hole

A number of years ago, I talked to a fellow who was a passionate geranium grower. He kept geranium "mother plants" in his solarium during winter. In February, he would snip-off close to a hundred cuttings and grow them into well-rooted transplants for his garden.

I could tell that he had a lot of experience with geraniums and that he knew what he was doing because he always had good success with his crop—well, almost always. The day that he talked to me he was exasperated because all of his cuttings were dying and he couldn’t figure why.

When I asked him if used the same growing protocol every year, he said yes—except for one thing. The one difference was that his son-in-law had given him some bags of “professional potting soil” that he had used to root the cuttings. In the past, he had blended his own mixture, but thought that the professional mixture should be just as good.

When I asked this fellow to provide me with a sample of his mixture for testing, the reasons why his cuttings were dying were very clear. The “professional potting soil” had an extremely low pH and an extremely high level of salt. The geraniums simply couldn’t survive in this toxic blend.

Once he got rid of the bad soil mixture, he was able to salvage quite a few cuttings although he had no where near his usual number of good cuttings.

The take home lesson with soils is this: with some experience, you can judge the physical quality of a mixture by looking at it, but you can’t judge the chemical quality visually. Only a soil test will reveal whether or not a soil’s chemistry is up to snuff.

In my "Soil: It's Not Dirt!" Workshop, I reveal all that you need to know about the physical and chemical properties of soils. Once you understand the basics you will know what to look for in a great quality soil.

- Jim Hole

NEW: Terrarium Workshop!

May 11th, 2-3PM in the Floral Studio

Interested in starting a terrarium? Looking for a fun activity to do with a friend or family member? Love crafting? You're in luck! The Floral Studio at Hole's is offering a Terrarium Workshop Thursday, May 11th from 2-3pm. Let our experts guide you through the proper terrarium building techniques, providing tips and tricks to ensure your terrarium will remain healthy and long-lasting. Everything you need to start a terrarium is included in this workshop, so you're guaranteed to leave the studio with a terrarium you can show off!

  • $79/person
  • All workshop supplies included

Spots are limited, so book today! Call 780-419-6800 (9am-4:30pm, Monday-Friday) to reserve your spot.

DIY: Build Your Own Terrarium!

Because a terrarium is a self-contained ecosystem, you must set it up properly the first time, using proper materials. Be sure to buy a high-quality potting mix and select the appropriate plants. 

Materials

Supplies needed:

  • One terrarium with air holes or a glass jar without a lid
  • Small gravel, pea rock or coloured glass
  • Jim Hole’s Potting Soil
  • Sphagnum moss
  • Decorative accessories (stones, drift wood, wtc.)
  • Plants (two or three for every 3L of space; avoid fuzzy-leaved plants – they hold water and are susceptible to rotting)

Preparing the soil

 Start by creating a 1 cm base of gravel at the bottom of the terrarium. The gravel provides proper drainage, which is important because the container has no holes. 

Next, cover the gravel with a layer of potting mix. At least 5 cm of mix is required, but the mix can come up as high as half the height of the terrarium. 

Note: Charcoal is not necessary. The common belief is that charcoal will ‘filter’ the soil and keep it clean, but activated charcoal becomes inactive as soon as it is exposed to carbon in the air. 

Transplanting

Space plants according to the mature height and spread listed on their tags. 

Prepare holes in the soil where the plants will go by gently scooping away enough potting mix to bury the roots to the same depth as they were growing in their pots. 

Remove plants from containers and examine the roots. Packed and tangled (rootbound) rootballs can be gently teased loose. Don’t worry if the soil falls off plants while transplanting. Losing some is fine. 

Place plants in prepared holes and gently firm the soil, being careful not to pack it. Remove any damaged leaves. 

Trimming the terrarium

Decorate the soil with bits of moss or add other finishing touches such as driftwood or decorative stones. You’re creating your own little world, so let your imagination guide you. 

Watering

Give plants a thorough watering, but don’t over water. A terrarium sustains itself, so the first watering is essential to establishing the correct moisture level. 

Watching it grow

Placing a terrarium in a direct sun might seem like a nice treat for your plants, but it’s the equivalent of steaming vegetables in a pot! 

If you didn’t use a container with air holes, don’t cover your terrarium with a lid. Although it’s possible to grow plants in a self-contained environment, it’s incredibly difficult and requires perfect light, temperature and humidity conditions. 

Visit Hole's today and find everything you need to create your own custom terrarium! 

Dig In: St. Albert's Horticulinary Festival!

Dig-In, St. Albert’s Horticulinary Festival, is an exciting weekend of culinary adventure that will excite you with the possibilities and benefits of eating locally grown food.

Through celebrity hosted meals, along with a series of demonstrations and hands-on workshops, participants will learn how to grow food in an urban setting and to prepare and preserve their own produce. Additionally, those who take part will discover the delicious joy of food they've grown themselves.

Chef Desiree Nielsen, star of the Gusto TV show The Urban Vegetarian, teams up with the Glasshouse Bistro to prepare a special one-time brunch menu. Filled with healthy options and lots of fresh ingredients, this interactive multi-course brunch will allow you to put the finishing touches on some of your dishes and taste some amazing health-boosting brunch options.

Chef Corbin Tomaszeski, star of HGTV's Restaurant Makeover and The Food Network's Dinner Party Wars, teams up with the Glasshouse Bistro to prepare a special, one-time brunch and dinner menu. Flavourful, organic, and locally sourced, these interactive multi-course meals will allow you to taste some recipes right out of Chef Corbin’s kitchen.

Get your tickets today at: www.diginstalbert.ca

Food For Thought, By Lois Hole

I believe very strongly in education, so whenever I’m asked to speak at school, I do my best to come—although I must admit, sometimes I leave my preparations until the last minute.


One warm June morning, I visited a grade five and six class. The only topic I could come up with to talk about was “Watering in the Greenhouse”. When I got there and saw how tired the kids looked, my heart sank. “Oh crum,” I thought, “they aren’t going to listen to a word I say.”
Just then, my eye caught a pair of familiar, brightly smiling faces. Two little Italian boys, who often came out to the farm with their parents and grandparents, were sitting in the front row. With a flash of inspiration, I realized I didn’t have to talk about watering after all.


“Let me tell you a little story,” I said. “Years ago on our farm, we didn’t grow very many different kinds of vegetables. We had never grown broccoli or zucchini. Then, one day, some Italian customers came out to our farm and told us how to grow it and even how to cook it. The next year, we planted some. It was wonderful.”


The Italian boys sat there, beaming with pride. I began to look around at the other faces and realized that practically every ethnic group was represented in that classroom. So, I carried on with my strategy.


“We had German customers who taught us about growing big cabbages and making sauerkraut. Lebanese folks told us that vegetable marrow was especially delicious when picked small—they called it kousa. East Indians introduced us to hot peppers and showed us different ways to cook with them.”


I noticed one small boy in the back. I couldn’t see him very well without my glasses, so I tried to guess. “The Chinese people told us about using vegetables in stir-fry.” The boy didn’t bat an eye. “Darn,” I thought, “I made a mistake.” So I tried again. “And the Japanese showed us daikon and all the different ways they cook vegetables.” Still no reaction. Finally, he put up his hand and asked, “Mrs. Hole, what did the Koreans teach you?” Fortunately, I had recently tried kim Chee, Korean pickled cabbage, so I talked about that.


By now, the rest of the kids were jumping up and down, their hands waving in the air. “What about the Yugoslavians? What about the Hungarians?” Of course, I didn’t have an example to give each and every one of them, so when I was stumped, I simply asked, “What did you have for dinner last night?” When the child answered, I replied, “That’s it!” and made a mental note to add those dishes to my vegetable repertoire.


When I tell this story, I always add a fictional kid who asks me, “What did the English teach you?” I say, “Not much!” My husband, who’s of English descent, gets a big kick out of that!
But you know, those kids made me realize something. If it hadn’t been for new Canadians introducing us to all kinds of different, wonderful vegetables, our business wouldn’t have been nearly as successful. Because we were able to offer so many kinds of produce, people came from miles around to shop at our place.


I like to think of that phenomenon as a reflection of Canada’s success. Our diversity is our greatest strength.

-Lois Hole I'll Never Marry A Farmer

Stop Talking, Start Sprouting

Sure, we all want to create less waste, reduce our ecological footprint and use sustainable resources, but such a large task can be daunting. Sprouting Kits are a great place to start! At Hole’s Greenhouses, we believe that Urban Farming is a critical component of sustainable communities. "Food Deserts" (areas where nutritious food is difficult to access) are becoming increasingly common. Using a sprouting kit at home is one way of bridging the gap by putting nutritious, fresh food within arm’s reach.

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With the Biosta Sprouting Kit you can:

  • Grow shoots and sprouts that aren’t available at your local grocery store
  • Grow GMO and pesticide-free produce
  • Grow nutrient-dense produce; rich in natural vitamins, minerals, proteins, and enzymes
  • Harvest fresh sprouts in as little as 3 days!
  • Grow a variety of different seeds, year-round in the comfort of your own home
  • Use your fresh sprouts to make simple, tasty, and attractive gourmet dishes
  • Hide the sprouts and shoots in a smoothie for the kids!
  • Save money—each serving costs a few pennies
  • Reduce your ecological footprint with the "0 mile" diet!
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Stop talking and start sprouting today! Pick up your Biosta Sprouting Kit at Hole’s Greenhouses.

FREE Pruning Workshop This Weekend!

You know spring can’t be too far away when I’m talking about pruning! My first pruning workshop for 2017 is this coming Saturday (February 25th).
 
I thought as a bit of a teaser to the workshop, I would throw in a half dozen true or false pruning questions. Let’s see how you do.
 

  1. Birch and maple trees should only be pruned in late spring so that they don’t "bleed".
  2. When trees are threatening to grow into power lines "topping" the tree is the best strategy.
  3. Nice, clean, cuts close to the trunk are best to ensure the wound heals properly.
  4. Apple trees should only be pruned in the early spring.
  5. Don’t prune roses because you will cut-off the flower buds.
  6. Always remove top growth on a tree to balance root growth when transplanting.

 
If you answered False to all of these questions, you are correct. There are many myths surrounding tree pruning and I will explain the truth behind pruning so that you know how to tackle the pruning jobs in your yard, and also when it is best to leave it to the pros.
 
Pruning is one of my most popular workshops so be sure to register early. See you on Saturday!

~Jim Hole

Fashionistas Rejoice!

Beautifully chic with a touch of elegance, we are now carrying tops and purses by Simply Noelle!

Whether you need a top for that dinner party, or something more relaxed for that walk along the Sturgeon—whatever the occasion—Simply Noelle will have the look for you.

All tops are made of either cotton or polyester, which feel soft to the touch and beautiful quality finish.

Purses are also available in different sizes and colors and are all made of vegan leather and offer beautiful inside lining. Great for any occasion!

All items are available for purchase at Hole’s Greenhouses near the checkouts.

So come on over and visit us while items are still available!

Simply beautiful, simply affordable, Simply Noelle.

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Gardening For The Complete Novice

When I was a kid growing up on the farm, Dad would send me in to town to pick up parts for our equipment. I hated that job.
 
It’s not that I didn’t like mechanical things, because I did, but whenever I picked-up a part, I dreaded the conversation with the parts guy. Nine times out of ten, I felt stupid and embarrassed because I didn’t have a clue about what all the "parts lingo" meant.
 
Once I got older and gained some experience and knowledge with mechanical things, I could hold my own at the parts desk, but I learned a valuable lesson on how to treat people who are novices in a particular field.
 
For those who are new to the world of plants I know that Latin names, fertilizer ratios, and bugs are just some of the things that scare people who have never gardened. As a result, I will be offering workshops for those who feel a bit intimidated about trying to grow plants for the first time.
 
So, if you don’t know the first thing about a seed, soil or fertilizer, my plan is to help you feel comfortable with entering into the plant world.
 
So if you have ever felt like I did at the parts department make sure that you sign up for "Gardening For Complete Novices".

Who knows, it could be a stepping stone to a career in horticulture!


~Jim Hole

Starting Seeds Indoors

I’ve had a few questions from people who are coming to this weekend’s workshop on "Starting Seeds Indoors".  It seems that the two most common questions everyone wants answered are:
 
"When do I start my seeds indoors?" and "How do I keep my seedlings from getting stretched and floppy?"
 
The simple answer to these questions is that you need to understand a bit about the growth habits of the seed that you are sowing and how temperature, light, and water affect the seeds and seedlings.
 
This weekend we are going to get into the "minds" of seed and I’m going to explain how seeds perceive their growing environment and how they react to it. Once you understand what makes seed "tick" it is pretty easy to start seeds indoors and grow great seedlings.
 
I like the step by step approach for starting seeds indoors so my game plan is to lay out all of the steps and materials required to get from the start line (seeds in a package) to the finish line (healthy, vibrant seedlings).
 
At last count we had close to 3000 seed varieties in our garden centre – the largest selection in the region – so I won’t be going through the idiosyncrasies of every variety but I will tackle many of the most popular types of seed.
 
Hope to see you this weekend!


~Jim Hole