trees

Podcast: Skinny & Dwarf Trees for Small Yards - Jim Hole's Top 5 Tips

Are you wondering about growing a tree in a yard without much space but couldn't make it out to one of Jim's FREE talks? Well, you're in luck! Jim Hole has recorded a skinny and dwarf tree podcast on the Hole's Radio Network, available here.

In this episode of the Hole's Radio Network, Jim Hole chats with Brad Walker—the reluctant gardener—about the top 5 things everybody needs to know about growing a tree in a small space.

Play it below or download it by clicking here and—when you're done checking it out—please let us know what you think (by replying in the comments below). Also, let us know if you'd like to see more podcasts or video tutorials in the future.

Podcast: The Best Ways to Water Your Garden, Containers, Lawn, & Trees - Jim Hole's Top 5 Tips

Are you wondering about the best watering advice for your garden, lawn, trees, or containers but couldn't make it out to one of Jim's FREE talks? Well, you're in luck! Jim Hole has recorded a podcast all about watering your plants on the Hole's Radio Network, available here.

In this episode of the Hole's Radio Network, Jim Hole chats with Brad Walker—the reluctant gardener—about the top 5 things everybody needs to know about watering their plants.

Play it below or download it by clicking here and—when you're done checking it out—please let us know what you think (by replying in the comments below). Also, let us know if you'd like to see more podcasts or video tutorials in the future.

Mr. Appleseed

TedJimBill.jpg

My Dad was a bit of a "Johnny Appleseed". He loved nothing better than planting trees (not just apples) and planted thousands of them over his lifetime.

Before he moved to the farm, back in the '50s, the land he purchased was pretty much stripped clean of trees to make way for crops like alfalfa and barley. But Dad knew that trees were invaluable for trapping snow during the winter and providing shelter for heat loving vegetable crops. He also knew that trees reduced soil erosion and provided habitat for wildlife. 

Today, while most of that farmland has been converted to houses, some of Dad’s shelterbelt trees remain, providing shade and beauty for residents and visitors alike.

People would often ask Dad about which tree was his favourite and he would just say, “All of them”.

 And all of them was a heck of a lot of trees.

~Jim Hole

You Plant A Tree For Your Grandchildren

About 10 years ago, my neighbour’s spruce toppled in a windstorm and smashed into our fence. The middle section of the fence was obliterated, but at least our house was spared.

fallen-tree-edmonton-alberta

These past couple of weeks I have visited a number of homes that have trees with structural problems. One was an apple that had a large branch snap during a snowstorm. A couple of weeks ago, an acreage owner had a poplar topple during a windstorm resulting in a severely damaged roof. Finally, a young couple with small children, were asking me about what should be could be done about their neighbour’s large poplar tree that was leaning, precariously towards their house.   

As a certified arborist, I’ve seen a lot of trees with a lot of problems. While many people tend to focus on insect and disease problems on the tree’s foliage, the major of a tree’s problems (about 80%) originate in the root zone. Preventing a tree from becoming ‘hazardous’ is not difficult if the proper steps are taken beginning with something as ‘simple’ as transplanting. Incorrect planting depth, poor soil, improper staking, and inadequate or excessive watering are mistakes that are often made during transplanting that have a huge impact on trees years later.

As the saying goes, ‘You plant a tree for your grandchildren’. It’s important that they have the opportunity to enjoy it…safely!

~Jim Hole

 

Iseli Trees

Our Terraces are now stocked with dozens of different varieties of beautiful and rare conifers and evergreens, spanning in size from giant forest trees to tiny miniatures.

iseli-trees-edmoton-stalbert-holes

Conifers provide an exciting array of colour from the darkest greens through the brightest yellows, blues and even red tones. 

The flowering parts of many conifers can add seasonal interest with their colours ranging from bright scarlet reds, pinks and purples to soft shades of green, yellow and orange.

Here are a few of the unique varieties we have this year:

pinus-banksiana-uncle-fogy-edmonton-stalbert-yeg

"Uncle Fogy" Pinus Banksiana  - Wildly undulating, pendulous branches give unique character to every plant of this distinctive form of Jack Pine.

The plants bend and swoop to create a curvy, living sculpture decorated with resinous winter buds.

This collector's plant, first discovered in a garden in Richfield, Minnesota, seems to be a reference to everyone's eccentric relative. Extremely hardy and adaptable, "Uncle Fogy" tolerates heat, cold, and dry, sandy or poor soils.


silberlocke-abies-koreana-horstmanns-edmonton

"Horstmann's Silberlocke" Abies koreana  - This Colourful, hardy Korean Fir stands out in the garden with stunning two-toned needles.

The Needles of this small, pyramidal tree are recurved, displaying the silver-white undersides which give a gleaming colour and uncommonly beautiful textural effect.


8598025935_91da7e793c_b.jpg

"Formanek" Picea Abies  - This radically prostrate, slow-growing form of Norway Spruce will become a densely matted, spreading carpet over time.

If staked up, it's arching, weeping branches cascade down and create a pendulous form. Unstaked, it is the perfect plant to creep over and around rocks and walls.


pinus-cembra-westerstede-tree-edmonton

"Westerstede" Pinus Cemba - Named for an ancient German city in a nursery region similar to Oregon's Willamette Valley, this beautiful pine represents the finest in hardy garden conifers.

Long luxurious needles give the small upright tree a full, fluffy look. Slower and wider than other cembras, it has graceful branching, attractive colour, and striking cones that offer year-round interest and character in a small space.

 

Come down to Hole's to see all the different varieties we have available this year!

 

When to Prune Your Fruit Trees

Now is a great time to prune those long neglected apple, cherry, apricot, pear, and plum trees. 

I know that a lot of people become stressed-out about pruning fruit trees, fearing that they will irreparably harm them.

While it’s true that bad pruning can harm trees, no pruning is often just as bad if not worse.

Here are a few simple rules for pruning your fruit trees:


•    Don’t remove more than a quarter of the branches in any one year
•    Ensure that every branch is attached to the tree at a wide angle. Narrow "V-shaped" branch attachments are weak and can split
•    Remove broken branches
•    Remove crossing branches
•    Never leave a "stub" but never "flush cut" a branch, always leave a "collar" that is a few millimeters deep 

If you are still a little apprehensive about pruning, pop on down to Hole’s, and we can show you how!

~Jim Hole

Now fully stocked on all Corona pruning shears, loppers, saws, pole pruners, and hand pruners.

Now fully stocked on all Corona pruning shears, loppers, saws, pole pruners, and hand pruners.

Fall Gardening: Moving Perennials and Planting Trees in the Fall

AdobeStock_116044170.jpeg

At this time of the year, I get asked everyday if this is still a good time to plant.

The fact is that for many plants fall it is actually THE BEST time to plant! It's also a great time to get deals on perennials, trees, and shrubs too!

Why is it the best time to plant? Well, with plants preparing for winter, there is no energy being used for new growth. Soon leaves will start to drop and the sap stream will stop. All the plant's energy will go to root development and the soil is still warm enough for plants to settle in.

That said, plants that you buy in a garden centre will probably be "root-bound" after growing in a pot for a whole season.  For this reason, it is really important to break up that rootball at planting time, to give the plant a chance to develop new roots. Massaging the rootball lightly will likely not be enough. If necessary, take a knife to loosen the roots and really roughen them up. Make sure you have watered the plant before you do this.

  • Fall is also a good time to plant, move, or split most perennials.You can still see what is growing where and it is easy to remember what was not working well.
  • Most perennials can be split and re-located in fall or spring, but for Peonies, Bearded Irises, and Lilies, fall is the very best time.
  • Tender perennials and grasses are better relocated in spring. Shrubs and most evergreens can be re-located till mid-October.
  • I would not plant or relocate cedars any later than the end of September. 
  • All other trees can be planted or transplanted for as long as the ground is soft.
  • If you have any hardy perennials or shrubs in a pot or planter that you would like to survive winter, then this is the time to plant them in the ground. In our harsh Alberta winters plants will almost never survive in a pot.

When transplanting, mix in some Sea Soil into the new hole that you've dug.Sea Soil is our best compost here at Hole’s. It is made from composted forest fibres and composted fish. It works well for just about any plant and I love the smell of it that reminds me of forest in fall.

Finally, remember to water your plants during fall and soak everything really well before the ground freezes, usually towards the end of October.

 
~Maria Beers
 

 

Maria is a landscape designer trained and educated in the Netherlands. She owned a landscape design business for 10 years before moving to Edmonton in 2005 and joining the Hole's team. Interested in booking a landscape consultation with Maria? Click here.