blooms

Container Roses Light Up Your Patio or Balcony

Container Roses Light Up Your Patio or Balcony

By Christina McDonald

There are many reasons to have roses in containers rather than in a traditional garden or order. Perhaps you have limited space, making the deck or balcony your only option. Or you may want to have a rose close at hand, to easily enjoy its beauty, scent and burst of colour.

Regardless of the reason, a container rose is an easy-to grow delight.Choose your rose and the container carefully. A 24-cm pot will easily accommodate a small miniature rose, whereas a large, robust Hybrid Tea will need a container at least 37 cm in diameter. Consider the shape, colour and material of the pot and whether it will compliment the form of the rose and its bloom colour. Traditional urns of roses are stunning, but so are hanging baskets; don’t be afraid
to try something new. Keep in mind that roses growing in plastic or glazed pottery vessels will require less water than clay or fibre.

Whichever pot you choose, fill it with good quality potting soil; regular garden soil will harden in the pot, and may carry soil-borne diseases. Potting soil won’t compact, allowing for better drainage; plus, it breathes and holds fertilizer well.

Select roses that are well suited to container growing. Roses with strong, upright growth that supports blooms above the foliage are ideal, as they hold up well to the elements and you can see each bloom. Cascading forms look striking with their blooms tumbling over the sides of a pot and compact forms can provide a very formal mounded look to a patio setting. The fun part is choosing a rose based on your own preference for flower form, fragrance, foliage and, of course, colour.

Roses prefer full sun, so place your pots accordingly (try moving your pots around the deck to follow the sun—that’s what I do as the season progresses). Make sure to keep your roses well
watered and once a week it helps to add a pinch of 20-20-20 fertilizer to the watering can. Remember to remove spent blooms regularly. While container roses are far more prone to drying out than those in the garden, take heart—they are much easier to weed. That feature alone may inspire you to try your hand at growing a glorious pot of roses!

You’re sure to find a suitable rose in every class—some are even purposely bred for this use. Here are a few of our tried and true favourites and some newer varieties to consider.
Abbaye De Cluny
Abraham Darby
Baby Love
Barbra Streisand
Bronze Star
Cupcake
Cyril Fletcher
Dream series
Flower Carpet series
Gizmo
Marmalade Skies
Octoberfest
Origami
Palace series
Ruffles series
Sheila’s Perfume
Singin’ in the Rain
Weeping China Doll

The Annual Elite

The Annual Elite

All-America Selections is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting excellence in plant breeding. Each year, a panel of volunteer judges selects some of the very best varieties, recognizing them for outstanding garden performance, beauty or, in the case of edible plants, flavour. AAS winners usually have at least two or three significant improvements over previous similar varieties!

‘Blue Wave’ Petunia

The ‘Wave’ series is already well-known for unparalleled vigour, producing dozens of large, vibrant blooms on huge, bushy plants. ‘Blue Wave’ possesses the same admirable qualities as its predecessors, but the blooms are a rich, fade-proof, deep blue. And it flowers all season with no pinching or pruning!

‘Prairie Sun’ Rudbeckia

‘Prairie Sun’ is a show-stopping, 90-cm tall rudbeckia with fantastic 12-cm blooms. The golden petals are tipped in primrose yellow and the eye is a gorgeous light green. It looks great as a focal point in containers!

‘Corona Cherry Magic’ Dianthus

This unique dianthus blooms in cherry red, lavender or a bicolour mosaic of both, resulting in an unpredictable but beautiful array of colour.

‘Purple Majesty’ Ornamental Millet

Ornamental millet is great for adding height and texture to a bed. ‘Purple Majesty’ accomplishes both feats and brings a fantastic dark purple colour to the garden. Plus, the tall flower spikes make ideal cut flowers.

‘Can Can Scarlet’ Carnation

A bouquet of carnations will warm the heart and these beauties have the added attraction of a powerful, spicy fragrance. The blooms are a vibrant scarlet, while the stems are an attractive shade of grey-green. The flower shape and quality are similar to commercial cutflower carnations!

Popular Poppies

When it comes to describing poppies “popular” is an understatement. The Poppy family includes a gigantic selection of species, and are native to many parts of the world, including Central and Southern Europe, China, India, and other parts of Asia. The flowers are attractive to pollinators like honey bees, butterflies and hummingbirds. As an added bonus, the home gardener can choose from almost any colour in the rainbow, including black. 

Poppies-Hungarian-breadseed-california-orange-oriental-edmonton


Since poppies produce seeds so effortlessly, ensuring a continuous supply is easy. Once the flower is finished blooming, each poppy provides hundreds of seeds you can use the following year to keep your garden colourful without spending extra money.


Whether you want large blousy blooms, small delicate dwarf varieties, or elegant flowers that will make a statement, there is always a poppy to suit! Here are a few varieties you might enjoy:

Hungarian-breadseed-poppy-edmonton-stalbert


Hungarian Breadseed Poppy (Papaver spp.) – Baking with poppy seeds is a centuries old tradition. If you’re looking to harvest seeds from your poppies, the Hungarian Breadseed is a great choice.


Hungarian Breadseed flowers will bloom in spring and early summer, and then drop their petals to form fat seed capsule pods. Once the pods get brown and hard, they can cracked open to remove a surprising number of blue-black seeds you can use in your breads, cakes, or muffins.


But seeds aren’t the only thing this poppy is good for. This heirloom strain also has beautiful white or pale lavender-pink petals with contrasting dark centres, perfect for planting in rock gardens, windowsill planters, or in containers on your patio or deck.


Oriental-brilliant-scarlet-red-poppy-edmonton-stalbert


Oriental Brilliant Scarlet Poppy (Papaver orientale) - Oriental poppies are the most striking of the perennial poppies. With eye-catching cup-shaped flowers, textured like crêpe paper, these flowers are guaranteed to be the focal point in your garden this summer. 


The plant's huge flowers can grow up to 6 inches across on stems up to 4 feet tall! It’s no wonder these poppies are a favourite subject with so many artists and gardeners alike.


Once planted, they require no special care and will last for many years. Their original vibrant red-orange colour is still the most popular for growing, though oriental poppies come in a variety of colours that will match or blend any garden’s color scheme.


California-orange-poppy-edmonton-stalbert


California Orange Poppy (Eschscholzia californica) - California poppies are a perfect choice for hot, dry areas but will grow almost anywhere without a fuss. These golden-orange poppies are perfect for covering a neglected or hard-to-cultivate area, or for a memorable display in a large garden space. 


California poppies boast a single, cup-shaped bloom that, in the wild, range from clear yellow to golden orange through to bronze. The flowers close at night and open as the sun touches them each morning.


These annuals are easy-to-grow and drought-tolerant, providing a carefree spring carpet of bloom in all climate zones. 


With such ease and simplicity, poppies are a welcome plant to all gardens. Once a gardener includes poppies in their garden, they will find it hard to remember a time without them!